Tuesday, 6 December 2016

North, the Rise and Fall of the Polar Cosmos by Gyrus


http://polarcosmology.com/

What would it be like if culture was completely different, if we had taken any of a number of different routes in our cultural past? Not many authors dig as deep as Gyrus has done in 'North', dismantling deeply-embedded cultural assumptions.

Sure, there are other books, and this is indeed a hopeful trend in culture; instead of tinkering or trying to patch up the mess we have at the moment, let's look at its very roots and see if we can detect the basic flaws in our worldviews. Morris Berman did it with his 1989 book 'Coming To Our Senses', in which he shows how cultural shifts rely on some kind of collective gnosis, some new and ecstatic apprehension of reality, and that this cultural shift is not always a benign one. More recently and coming from a slightly different direction we have Nikki Wyrd's essay in which she suggests we abandon the primacy of 'higher' in her blog piece Dionysus' Doorway (https://theblogofbaphomet.com/2016/05/08/dionysus-doorway/ ).

On the cover of 'North' is a vortex, and the main text is sandwiched between two halves of an Extraordinary State of Consciousness at a Glastonbury festival. The core of the book takes us to where we can begin to see the underpinnings of our cultural assumptions; starting with Fire, where the rising sparks of a blaze point us to Sky and we encounter the first binary, earth and heaven. Once we have that vertical, we can divide up the surface of the earth, and we get North. The vertical binary is then applied to the body, and we get Head. Then the development of Copernican astronomy gives us Revolution. After that, Ice and the mysterious icy poles and finally, Space and its relevance to our current myths.

This is a very dense book, stuffed full of references to things you're unlikely to have read. But that is probably inevitable when a writer casts his net so wide in trying to catch the very biggest ideas. By and large, Gyrus succeeds in this ambitious quest; his dismantling of culture is a superb corrective to the Golden Age Aeonic narratives - such as those of Julius Evola - that are trotted out under the banner of Tradition. North is a toolkit, and part of a growing trend of rejecting the bases of the cultural forces that have got us to the state we are in today.

The link at the top is for buying the book (which I definitely recommend if you are interested in cultural transformation) but is also a whole website and blog devoted to the ideas in this book. Check it out. We have not heard the last of these ideas.

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for sharing the post. It’s something we all can read and it’s so helpful. After you have written a blog post, you’ll probably read new information, get fresh book, read new reviews, etc which will make sense to add to your post.

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